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Comments on sentences (total 49802)

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Pfirsichbaeumchen
19 minutes ago
I'd suggest unlinking the Japanese.
Delian
24 minutes ago - edited 14 minutes ago
Definitely old-fashioned and rare, but it's still possible to hear a sentence like this.
CK
CK
an hour ago - edited an hour ago
I think you'd just have to contribute a duplicate of this substituting in the name of a single-named ancient Greek poet.

However, perhaps rather than creating a very near duplicate of this one, creating an example of this usage with a different sentence pattern might be better.

Note that we do have a few "Homer" sentences.

http://tatoeba.org/eng/sentence...eng&to=und
Delian
2 hours ago
>Note: This sounds a bit strange because we would normally use a full name here,
>instead of just a first name.

Perfectly true for a modern poet, but if you replaced "Tom" with any single-named ancient Greek poet it would be a very natural-sounding sentence.

How would Tatoeba typically distinguish between cases like that? With tags like "ancient" or "modern"? With notations in the comments?
CK
CK
3 hours ago
Related:

[#36639] Every child needs someone to look up to and copy.
CK
CK
3 hours ago - edited 3 hours ago
It's likely close enough in meaning to work as an alternate translation for some of our existing sentences, but I don't think it's an exact match in English, so I wouldn't directly link the 2 English sentences. However, this sentence is not close enough in meaning to link to the Japanese translations of the other sentence, in my opinion.
Delian
4 hours ago
Delian
4 hours ago - edited 4 hours ago
@ Ooneykcall

The two English sentences quoted above are not equivalents, and shouldn't be on the same list. (It might help non-Americans to know that Chicago is colder than Boston, in both common perception and per statistics. http://www.currentresults.com/W...est-cities.php)

"Boston is too cold for me, let alone Chicago."

Says that Boston is too cold for the speaker, so (even colder) Chicago is beyond the realm of consideration.

"Boston is cold for me, unlike Chicago."

The straightforward reading indicates the speaker believes Chicago is warmer than Boston.

While it *could* be read with a wink and an intonation that indicates the speaker means exactly the opposite, for the purposes of this website and the needs of English language learners, I don't think we ought to assume a meaning contrary to the straightforward one. The weather comparison between Boston and Chicago may not be common knowledge outside the US.
Ooneykcall
5 hours ago - edited 5 hours ago
'Brain donor' for idiot? LOL!
Dumb cluck? Even better!
Ooneykcall
5 hours ago
It's very easy to see the two sentences are connected through a Russian sentence. (You could have checked that yourself, simply by clicking the other English sentence and observing.)

And don't say you've never heard of phrases that can mean polar opposites depending on manner of intonation :)

The Russian sentence features a lengthy discussion regarding whether it can actually be understood in two ways, and eventually this potential ambiguity is acknowledged: although the instinctive reading would correspond to the other English sentence, this one may also fit the Russian sentence if it is intoned differently (most likely in speech, where we often formulate sentences as we go along, which can influence the word/clause order).
Delian
5 hours ago
Would some kind person please tag this "sports"? Thank you. :)
Delian
5 hours ago
#33449 "Boston is too cold for me, let alone Chicago."

has ended up on the same list as

#2148494 "Boston is cold for me, unlike Chicago."

We've got some translations here that need to be checked, and some unlinked, I think.
janms
6 hours ago
"behaviour" is the correct spelling in Australian English. I am aware that "behavior" is the American way of spelling this word.
SugoiDesu
7 hours ago
למדתי רבות מהשיחה הזו.
patgfisher
7 hours ago
happy . --> happy.

"When there were" --> If there were

As the first "were" is subjunctive i.e. "If there were ... to choose from" the second verb also needs to be in the subjunctive "I would be even happier"

I suggest "happier" rather than "more happy."

"hot teas" should be OK on the assumption that more than one variety of tea was available.

my suggested version:

If there were fruit juices, iced mineral water and hot teas to choose from, I would be even happier.
Delian
7 hours ago
Please remove the NNC tag. Thank you.
patgfisher
8 hours ago - edited 8 hours ago
Interesting comments. I wasn't aware this was only used in Australia. We say it all the time. Anyone who's been here might have heard (approximate spelling) "Owzit goin, mate? Awrite" In this phrase, the speaker tends to answer the question for the person he's talking to!!
CK
CK
8 hours ago
I don't know French at all.
Is this the implication of the French as well?
Delian
9 hours ago
>Wouldn't it be "him" instead of "it" in that case?

@CK

If the potential novice were onboard already, then "him" - the target.
If the potential novice was still unsure about the whole thing, then "it" - the idea.
"There's a good target. You should try (doing) it. Approach him and flirt away. Go on."
CK
CK
9 hours ago
Wouldn't it be "him" instead of "it" in that case?
CK
CK
9 hours ago
Perhaps someone can tag this as "male name" or "female name"

There are 3 other sentences that ned the same tag.

http://tatoeba.org/eng/sentence...eng&to=und
maaster
9 hours ago
Delian
9 hours ago
>I wonder in what natural situation this would ever be used.

@CK

Ummmmm, one gold digger pointing out a likely target to her friend, a potential novice gold digger?
CK
CK
10 hours ago
>He's rich. You should try it.

I wonder in what natural situation this would ever be used.
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Alain is a popular French name, cognate to Alan.
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Please add a period at the end of the sentence.
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Incomplete sentence. Suggest "I could not understand it."
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Incomplete sentence. I can't help doing what?
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Since this sentence apparently has several uses, I have taken the liberty to tag it simply 'non-standard', which it clearly is.
Delian
10 hours ago
My first thought was of Robert Newton playing Long John Silver. It would be a perfect sentence to use on International Talk Like a Pirate Day. :)
Delian
10 hours ago
I have an honest question about copyright.

"Life is like a box of chocolate. You never know what you are gonna get." has become a popular saying since the 1994 film "Forrest Gump," but are we on shaky legal ground here?
Sanaseppo
12 hours ago
Sure. It's great to have native speakers voice their opinion since, even though I might know the meaning of individual words, the sentences might have some weird quirks that go under my radar, if you catch my drift.
maaster
12 hours ago
Remélem, ezek a mondatok is megkapják a megérdemelt kritikát, hogy nem fedik pontosan egymást.
fekundulo
13 hours ago
I was not aware of such anomaly. I added the Australian English tag.
CK
CK
13 hours ago
... or you could use the standard name order.


FROM:
Mary convinced Tom to see a psychoanalyst.
TO:
Tom convinced Mary to see a psychoanalyst.
marafon
14 hours ago
@check translation
eng <> fra
Ooneykcall
16 hours ago
Info: the Russian sentence could be interpreted in two ways: a) we will destroy our nuclear weapons along with America (we both will); b) we will destroy our nuclear weapons [only] together with America, i.e. on condition that America does it, too.
sabretou
16 hours ago
I think "We, along with America, will destroy our nuclear weapons" sounds more natural.
patgfisher
16 hours ago
Question mark.

similar pattern to these
#2650249 How could I have been so stupid?
#3219329 How could you be so stupid?
#2711943 How could anyone be so stupid?
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