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CK
CK
an hour ago
The "a" in "capital" looks right, but it's not the standard English "a" character.

If you re-type this, likely our duplicate-merging script will merge the two sentences and their translations together.


#5100569 (capit&#1072;l)
Seoul is the capitаl of South Korea.

#3992009 (capital)
Seoul is the capital of South Korea.
danepo
2 hours ago
Could this sentence mean both
"We rented the apartment."
and
"We rented out the apartment."
?
honestlang
3 hours ago
Hi, my "He is too clingy" sentence does not belong here.
honestlang
4 hours ago
Yeah, thing is I wrote "Wherever I go, I will follow" because that is what made the most sense to me at the time, but I am glad we now have a better translation.
Ooneykcall
4 hours ago
Feel free! :)
At least the sentence makes sense now. Considering that's what the indirectly linked German sentence says literally, and the author is a German speaker, that's probably what he actually meant.
Now that may still sound too literal to some, but I'm not one to raise doubts.
honestlang
4 hours ago - edited 3 hours ago
Ooneykcall, that is a better translation. I will add it if you don't mind.
Ooneykcall
4 hours ago
We've got #4735991 as an indirect translation (added by the same person who added the Swedish sentence, who is a German native speaker).
"Wherever I go, I bring myself with me", I guess it must've been intended as some sort of metaphor, like I don't let myself be drawn to memories of places I've been to before, or something. But that's just a guess, one has to ask the author.
honestlang
4 hours ago - edited 4 hours ago
objectivesea, it's correct grammatically, but no, it does not sound natural to me and no Swede I know uses it. I did not write the Swedish ofc.

CK, my English translation is the best translation I can think of at the moment. Let's wait until a native Swedish speaker can find a better English translation.
CK
CK
5 hours ago
Welcome to the Tatoeba Project.

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CK
CK
10 hours ago - edited 10 hours ago
Perhaps it's a typo of the following.

I'll follow you wherever you go.
or

... no matter where ...
Objectivesea
11 hours ago
Not so sure that this is a natural and correct sentence. At least, I cannot think of circumstances under which it would be uttered.
CK
CK
13 hours ago
Related:

[#1529645] My sister plays piano every day. (erikspen) *audio*
[#3479731] Tom practices the piano every day. (CK) *audio*
[#250978] My sister plays the piano every day. (CK) *audio*
[#252421] I have practiced piano every day for fifteen years. (CK) *audio*
[#3953987] My older sister plays the piano every day. (KoreanBeaver)
[#3479729] My parents made me practice the piano every day. (CK)
[#3415214] Tom's father made him practice the piano every day for at least thirty minutes. (CK)
Ooneykcall
18 hours ago
This extremely popular idiom gets translated in a myriad different ways to languages that have no direct equivalent. Simple but difficult sentences like this one really have me in a love-hate relationship :>
Ooneykcall
18 hours ago
Thank you.

Yes, every translation that is conceivable depending on context may be added freely. Having multiple translations draws the learner's attention to the variety of meanings the expression may show. Of course, that creates a lot of 'technical' pairs (triplets, quadriplets...), such as rendering English you-sentences with a T or V pronoun, which I find rather boring. They are perfectly allowed, though, any possible translation is, but of course one is under no obligation to add anything they can think of.
honestlang
19 hours ago
If it is how it should be considered here, then yes.
Ooneykcall
19 hours ago
It's about the possible meanings, not just the one intended by the author. ;)
Is either interpretation valid given specific context?
honestlang
19 hours ago
Well I really mean the first one.
Ooneykcall
19 hours ago
Something like... experience the world around fully rather than keeping inside your shell (whether it be mommy's basement or hermit's hut)?
Ooneykcall
19 hours ago
Am I right thinking that this could mean both "they need to accept the consequences" (as in, face the reality) and "they need to experience the consequences"?
honestlang
19 hours ago
It means that you are out there living and thriving in the real world and on your own.
Ooneykcall
19 hours ago
What does "out there" really mean here, specifically?
honestlang
21 hours ago
Please delete my translation as it is a duplicate of another English translation. Thanks.


# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# This comment was copied from #5099023 when duplicate sentences were merged.
# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
honestlang
21 hours ago
Hi please delete my translation as someone else already translated this into English.


# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# This comment was copied from #5099005 when duplicate sentences were merged.
# --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
duran
23 hours ago
didn't get or wasn't able to get or couldn't get ?
CK
CK
yesterday
There is in the English sentence, but you wouldn't add it as part of the URL if the domain name didn't occur at the end of a sentence.
duran
yesterday
Is there a full stop after "com"?
CK
CK
yesterday
> I have long been sorrowing lamenting for your woes.

Are you sure this is what you meant to write?
CarpeLanam
yesterday
It's not in the Latin but I think you could assume this was the moment it became obvious she was his ex. Unless they made up afterwards, of course!
CK
CK
yesterday
This doesn't seem correct.
CK
CK
yesterday
Here is a better example sentence using the same pattern.

[#3023247] Tom's last name is Jackson. (CK) *audio*
CK
CK
yesterday
Same pattern:

[#2512872] Tom gave Mary a diamond ring. (sharptoothed) *audio*
CK
CK
yesterday
Are you sure that "engineering" should be capitalized?
CK
CK
yesterday
CK
CK
yesterday
I don't know Latin at all, but I wonder if you meant to say "ex-girlfriend."
CK
CK
yesterday
For sentences after the Tanaka Corpus import, you can tell which is the older sentence by its sentence number.

In this case, Japanese was the first.
https://tatoeba.org/eng/sentences/show/3569917

You can also see the logs on the right side of the page and see that the Swedish is a translation of the English. This means if you think the Swedish is a bad translation of the English, you should leave a comment on the Swedish sentence suggesting a better translation.

Sanaseppo 2015-10-26 10:35
linked to #4645755
honestlang
yesterday
Hi, it is hard to tell what the language of origin was but if the language of origin was Swedish then while the English is completely fine, IMO "I had a strange/weird dream" would sound better.
sacredceltic
yesterday
Yeah, I'll never get used to it, since a comma disjoins when "but" is a conjunction (from latin "join together"), so why on Earth would anyone successively join and disjoin 2 parts... They do the same in German. It's beyond me.
raggione
yesterday
The German sentence has been put into the past to fit the Esperanto.

My felling is that "is selling" should best be changed into "sold".
I leave it to others to decide whether this leads to a natural-sounding sentence.
CK
CK
yesterday
Other translations found of the Web ....

Everything flows and nothing remains unchanged.
Everything flows and nothing remains the same.
CK
CK
yesterday - edited yesterday
> Everything flows and nothing remains.

? Everything was washed away ...

I don't know Greek at all, I'm just guessing what you mean by "everything flows."
CK
CK
yesterday
Same pattern:

[#2547492] We know where Tom is. (CK) *audio*
CK
CK
yesterday
Thanks. I've edited it to match the audio.
CK
CK
yesterday
http://dcc.dickinson.edu/goodel...apter-614.html

eng
He broke down every one.
grc
Oὐδἐνα ὅντινʼ οὐ κατέκλασε.
CK
CK
yesterday
What you have been contributing is not compatible with the Tatoeba Project's license.
See http://blog.tatoeba.org/2011/01...d-content.html

I think you need to delete all of these English-Greek pairs.


http://dcc.dickinson.edu/goodel...eface-000.html
"The content is freely available for re-use under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license."

Anything contributed to the Tatoeba Project needs to be distributable under "Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license (CC-BY 2.0).
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