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Comments on sentences (total 50497)

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maydoo
29 minutes ago
mervert1
2 hours ago
"Indians" in this sentence refers to Amerindians, and not to people from India.
mervert1
6 hours ago - edited 6 hours ago
@patgfisher Changed. And I just used a semi-colon there. Thank u. :)
patgfisher
8 hours ago
I'm not sure if it can be used like this. You could "I can see Tom's not happy from the way he looks in the picture." but that is different I think.

There's also the idiomatic use meaning to keep someone informed on something: "Keep me in the picture about developments"
Ooneykcall
9 hours ago
What I mean is: can you "see" something intangible (the same way one says "I see a lot of potential in him") in the picture? Or is it a bad phrasing.
patgfisher
9 hours ago
I would say "I can see snow-covered mountains in the picture." but "I accidentally spilled coffee on the picture."
Ooneykcall
10 hours ago
Could this also have a figurative meaning (at least with 'in')?
patgfisher
10 hours ago
I took the engine apart.

duplicate of #3998693
patgfisher
10 hours ago
I took the engine apart.
patgfisher
10 hours ago
"pimp" needs something in front of it

a pimp
my pimp

(?)
patgfisher
11 hours ago
>The English sentence is the original one. :>

Thanks, I've worked it out by the numbers and times entered (still a bit confused sometimes).
patgfisher
11 hours ago - edited 11 hours ago
is originally not included --> was not originally included

I'm not sure about "as well as" in this context. To me, I think "as well as" would come after a positive earlier statement. I'd tend the say "neither were "W" and "Y", but I'd appreciate someone else's comment on this point.

Edit: The German is in the present tense and doesn't include "originally" so should it be: "K" is not included in the Portuges alphabet, neither/nor are "W" and "Y". (?)

Edit(2): I'm confused now, because the English sentence was there first so the German must be a translation of your sentence. In which case the German translation might be incorrect. (comment left on German sentence).
patgfisher
11 hours ago - edited 10 hours ago
St. James the Greater (?) [des Älteren]

Edit: please disregard my comment as the German is a translation of the English.
patgfisher
11 hours ago - edited 8 hours ago
If I were saying it, I'd say "in this picture" but there are examples of "on" being used on the internet.
Edit: I believe "on" is not correct in this context.
patgfisher
11 hours ago
I think "centre of the universe" is the normal expression.

(centre is the Australian spelling so I don't suggest you change "center").
patgfisher
11 hours ago
I'd suggest a rewording.

Either of the following would be OK:

Dan asked Linda could he spend the night with her.
Dan asked Linda to spend the night with him.
patgfisher
12 hours ago
Welcome to Tatoeba.

As the first verb is in the past tense, I would suggest "could not" instead of "cannot" and "were not allowed" instead of "are not allowed".
Balamax
17 hours ago - edited 17 hours ago
Exclamation mark
Ooneykcall
18 hours ago
Такие вещи же не переводятся - сокращения. Хоть бы ALLGEI было написано, так и соответствие законно, и намёк сохранен.
odexed
18 hours ago
That's it! I have already seen this word as plural but it just slipped my mind. Thanks.
Ooneykcall
18 hours ago
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bacteria
Lel no, bacteria is plural and bacterium is singular, original Latin forms. :D
In the US, "bacteria" can also be used as singular collective. (Compare "data", originally plural (sg. datum), but now increasingly used in singular collectively.)
Ooneykcall
18 hours ago
We knock on a wooden object (anything wooden would do) three times, but the Russian superstitious phrase is actually unrelated to the action, instead it refers to spitting over your left shoulder, another act of superstition. The two used to go together; now of course you don't spit when you're at home, but the phrase still survives.
Selami
19 hours ago
bpeel
19 hours ago
Yes, that's right. The superstition is that if point out how well you are doing or that something bad hasn't happened to you yet then it is bad luck and the bad thing is surely going to happen soon. But if you touch wood (or just say ‘touch wood’) then for some reason it breaks the jinx. I guess it's quite hard to translate unless the language's culture has a similar tradition. It's interesting to see that in the Catalan/Valencian version they touch iron instead!
Ooneykcall
20 hours ago
"touch wood" refers to the superstition, right?
patgfisher
20 hours ago
For even more emphasis you can use "don't you ever" #3996652

(This would be a father talking to a teenager most likely)
patgfisher
20 hours ago
it --> them (needs to be plural following plural "eggs").

had lower --> had a lower

everyday! --> every day.
patgfisher
21 hours ago - edited 21 hours ago
I suggest you remove ", Charles" and end the sentence with "me."

"You're all" is plural and Charles is singular, so cannot follow "you're all".
patgfisher
21 hours ago
I suggest:

I didn't trust Charles at all.
patgfisher
21 hours ago
Needs changing. The sentence doesn't make sense as it is.

I don't trust Charles. (?)
I don't consider Charles trustworthy. (?)
patgfisher
21 hours ago
This is not normal usage (in my experience).

Please advise what it means.

Should it be "You've lost me, Charles." - i.e. I don't understand you, Charles. (?)
Ooneykcall
yesterday - edited yesterday
This is an imperative, apparently. The pronoun can be added for emphasis: compare "go there" and "you go there", "don't forget it" and "don't you forget it".
"Don't you dare" is perhaps the most popular phrase of the type.
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