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Ooneykcall
36 minutes ago
Кстати, откуда дровишки, в смысле источник? Похоже на что-то интересное.
Ooneykcall
37 minutes ago
A native English is a native English person. Not that much of a difference. (The language is 'native English', if we must.)
Ooneykcall
41 minutes ago
Tickler
49 minutes ago
This is a distorted quote by German philosopher Richard David Precht from his book “Wer bin ich – und wenn ja, wie viele?”.

The original is “Sie kaufen Dinge, die sie nicht brauchen, um Leute zu beeindrucken, die sie nicht mögen, mit Geld, das sie nicht haben”, meaning “They buy things they don’t need to to impress people they don’t like with money the don’t own.”
muriloricci
59 minutes ago
None. It says the person would like to go to the sea more (times).
brauchinet
an hour ago
Is it "more often" or "once more" "(once) again?
CK
CK
6 hours ago - edited 6 hours ago
I would appreciate translations of this sentence, so I can use a screenshot of this page for http://www.manythings.org/tatoeba/start/.

Of course, I'd prefer the translations to be written by native speakers.
CK
CK
9 hours ago
Wouldn't the word "hugs" require "are" instead of "is?"
Christophe
13 hours ago
Thanks danepo.
Any better translation?
Dejo
17 hours ago
Christians are as confused as anybody else about which day is the day of rest. Here is a Wikipedia article about Sunday. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunday
tommy_san
18 hours ago
Thank you. I added a more literal translation that perfectly matches your explanation and unlinked the previous Japanese translation. Perhaps someone who knows Japanese can re-translate it using "weekend".

> Most printed calenders in English show Sunday as the first day.
I know it, but...

> In Judaism and Christianity the 7th day is Saturday, so Sunday is the first day.
I didn't know this. I thought Sunday was the seventh day because God rested on the seventh day.
muriloricci
18 hours ago
Not an English sentence.
Silja
19 hours ago
Is this a question or a suggestion? Or both...
Silja
19 hours ago
What does this "make out" mean?
Silja
19 hours ago
There should be a full stop instead of a question mark, I believe.
Eldad
19 hours ago
En Esperanto? Ne, ŝajnas al mi, ke tio ne estus la plej preciza maniero traduki tion al Eo. Ĉu eble: "La sistemo estas nun prizorgata"?
Ooneykcall
19 hours ago - edited 19 hours ago
"dial(l)ed the wrong number" +1
--
В данном случие "ошиблись" — сокращение от "ошиблись номером" ('mistaken by number', если хотите), так что это как раз адекватный перевод.
Eldad
19 hours ago
I remembered, and this is why I left out the hyphens. :)
I only slipped with the last one...

Well, I would indeed like to write your suggested sentence (I even wrote it at first), but as I need to keep the translation as close as possible to the original, the original reads "You are probably mistaken" (a more literal translation of the original would be: "You probably made a mistake"; would that be a more natural wording in this case? - maybe yes; I'll change it).
CK
CK
19 hours ago - edited 19 hours ago
Remember that English dialogs don't have a hyphen/dash inserted between parts of the dialogs.


Also, this seems to be a strange exchange, so it makes me wonder if the translation is correct.


Perhaps the 2nd sentences should be something like....

"I think you've dialed the wrong number."


Maybe this search will give you some other possibilities.

http://tatoeba.org/eng/sentence...eng&to=und
raggione
23 hours ago
Did you miss out the G in Schlumberera? See your German sentence.
Eldad
yesterday
Tickler
yesterday
It might be more “headed” than “bound”. When you want someone to catch the right bus you must make him look for the sign (which can be in very different locations, from hand-written to electronic etc.) with the destination, so what would be the most accurate way to imply this?
Eldad
yesterday
Guybrush88, could you add also an Italian variant (as you authored the sentence in the first place)?
Eldad
yesterday
At least one of the sentences linked here is not an accurate translation.
Eldad
yesterday
It is my understanding that this was Tickler's intention in his sentence (I thought about that after posting my sentence, when I didn't have access to my computer).
I'll correct my variant accordingly. Thanks, CK.
CK
CK
yesterday
Are you trying to say that the listener needs to get on the bus bound for Badstrabe and that they should get off at Seestrabe?

eric_vandenburg
yesterday
Oh, definately, but this isn't the place to discuss it!
eric_vandenburg
yesterday
CK: Sure we do. For instance here's the first line of "Jeff Briggs Love Story" by classic american author Bret Harte:
"It was raining and blowing at Eldridge's Crossing."


Ooneykcall
yesterday
Esperanto is an obviously euro-centric language. :3
eric_vandenburg
yesterday
CK, It's not a mistranslation, it's just a motivational type of statement. It's not supposed to be literal. It's like "America: the land of opportunity!"
CK
CK
yesterday
Since this is not true, I suspect that perhaps it's a mistranslation.

Perhaps the implication is more that Esperanto was designed as a language everyone could use.
Eldad
yesterday - edited yesterday
This needs to be checked by English native speakers who are transportation freaks. ;-)
patgfisher
yesterday
marafon
yesterday
When are you going to finish this? ≠ Вы это когда закончили?
Inaccurate translation. Unlinking from #904398.
Dejo
yesterday
I think the meaning is slightly ambiguous and only the context will make it clear. If you are working in a business which is open from Monday to Friday, then "the end of the week" is Friday afternoon. If the business is open on Saturday, then Saturday will be the end of the week.

Then there are cultural/religious problems about which day is the beginning or the end of the week. In Judaism and Christianity the 7th day is Saturday, so Sunday is the first day. Most printed calenders in English show Sunday as the first day.

This sentence was translated from French and French is ambiguous although they nowadays also use the word "weekend". Even so, weekend and end of the week may mean different things in different cultural contexts. In France high school students would get Thursday afternoon off but they had classes on Saturday morning. So their actual "weekend" would start later, but it was still the end of the week.
Ooneykcall
yesterday
No wonder, since "wont" is a literary word and rather elevated/posh at that.
maydoo
yesterday
I have never seen something like that.
Ooneykcall
yesterday
"be wont to do something" is an antiquated phrase meaning "be accustomed to do something, do something habitually". Therefore, this sentence means "it is my habit to take a shower in the morning".

Often used in phrases such as "as they were wont to say" (=as they would often say).

There is also the noun "wont", meaning "habit, custom, the way one usually does things", most often used in phrases like "as was their wont" (=as they would habitually/typically do).
tommy_san
yesterday
What do you think is the meaning of "before the end of the week"? Before Friday night or before Sunday night?
The Japanese sentence literally means "before the weekend", so it means before Friday night.
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