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<<< 1234567 >>
GrizaLeono
55 minutes ago
Kara mraz,
kion signifas NNC?
CK
CK
2 hours ago
You can find other sentence patterns mentioning 2 city names with this search.

https://tatoeba.org/eng/sentenc...o&from=eng
maydoo
7 hours ago
Could someone adopt this sentence, please?
Hybrid
8 hours ago
Thank you, but I don't think that it's unnecessary.
CK
CK
8 hours ago - edited 8 hours ago
Same pattern:

[#4903130] Tom and I rarely agree on anything.

I personally think this kind of near duplicate is unnecessarily wasting translators' time.
I would suggest following at least some of the ideas on this page.
http://bit.ly/tatoebawildcards
CK
CK
9 hours ago
Same pattern:

[#2641659] Tom followed Mary into the kitchen. (CK) *audio*
al_ex_an_der
15 hours ago
CK
CK
15 hours ago
Responding to NNC.

You are right, This is wrong.

> Do you know now what you wanted to know, don't you?


@maaster

I'd recommend contributing sentences in your own native language. You could be helping us much more that way, since people would be able to trust that what you have contributed is likely to be good and natural-sounding.

[#1230823] If you translate from your second language into your own native language, rather than the other way around, you're less likely to make mistakes.

[#1907470] It's very easy to sound natural in your own native language, and very easy to sound unnatural in your non-native language.

Even if some sentences by non-native speakers are good, it's really hard to trust that they are good, so members would be helping us much more by limiting their contributions to sentences in their own native languages. Remember that the purpose of the Tatoeba Project is to create example sentences that can be used for studying languages. It’s not really a place to be contributing non-native language sentences for others to correct for you.

[#3946394] We recommend adding sentences and translations in your strongest language. If you are interested primarily in having your sentences corrected, you should try a site like Lang-8.com, where that's the focus.





CK
CK
16 hours ago
Responding to NNC.

He probably means "Writers often use a pseudonym."
CK
CK
16 hours ago
> she does not speak with him

This needs proper capitalization and punctuation.

FROM:
she does not speak with him
TO:
She does not speak with him.


Welcome to the Tatoeba Project.

We have a quick start guide in the “More” menu.

http://en.wiki.tatoeba.org/arti...ow/quick-start


** The 2 Ways You Can Be the Most Helpful **

1. You can translate from a foreign language you know into your own native language.

2. You can create natural-sounding sentences in your own native language for others to translate into their native languages.
venticello
18 hours ago
В английском, в отличие от русского, правила пунктуации значительно свободнее. То есть, лишние запятые их не смущают. Они у них называются optional, usually unnecessary:
http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/commas.asp

Но в данном случае, да:
Rule 4b. A comma is usually unnecessary when the sentence starts with an independent clause followed by a dependent clause.

Example: Let me know now if you are not sure about this.

Wezel
18 hours ago
Не знаю, на что тут ссылаться, но запятую в таких случаях в англ не ставят. :)
Karok
20 hours ago - edited 20 hours ago
Is the meaning figurative or proper?
AlanF_US
23 hours ago - edited 23 hours ago
This is grammatically correct, but not semantically correct, since galloping is not considered a form of walking. Possible alternative:

Horses have three modes of locomotion: Walk, trot and gallop.

It would be possible to stay close to the Spanish and say:

Horses move in three modes: Walk, trot and gallop.

But I feel that's not accurate, either, since horses can move in other modes as well (jump, shake, lie down, etc.).
rabblerouzer
23 hours ago
This sentence is missing a subject and thus isn't a complete English sentence. My assumption is that it is a translation from the linked Japanese sentence, which uses zero pronoun reference. Maybe include "it" as the subject?
Wezel
yesterday - edited yesterday
Is it really present tense in Hebrew? Other translations from it have past tense.
Wezel
yesterday
CK
CK
yesterday
I'd recommend contributing sentences in your own native language. You could be helping us much more that way, since people would be able to trust that what you have contributed is likely to be good and natural-sounding.

[#1230823] If you translate from your second language into your own native language, rather than the other way around, you're less likely to make mistakes.

[#1907470] It's very easy to sound natural in your own native language, and very easy to sound unnatural in your non-native language.

Even if some sentences by non-native speakers are good, it's really hard to trust that they are good, so members would be helping us much more by limiting their contributions to sentences in their own native languages. Remember that the purpose of the Tatoeba Project is to create example sentences that can be used for studying languages. It’s not really a place to be contributing non-native language sentences for others to correct for you.

[#3946394] We recommend adding sentences and translations in your strongest language. If you are interested primarily in having your sentences corrected, you should try a site like Lang-8.com, where that's the focus.
slyfin
yesterday
Oh, I see it now. Even when there are typos, my brain always glosses right over them as if they didn't exist. Thanks.
CK
CK
yesterday
This should start with "It's" and not "It", don't you think?
I think that's what maaster was pointing out.
slyfin
yesterday
" whatcha-ma-call-it " = a colloquial common purpose noun for any object whose name can't be recalled. "thing-a-majig" is also sometimes used in a similar fashion.

In this constructed dialogue the speaker can't remember what the "thing" is called so the speaker instead substitutes "whatcha-ma-call-it" in place of the noun that he can not remember. Afterwards, the speaker remembers the name of the thing. The speaker exclaims, "Oh, that’s right!" in recollection. The speaker has finally remembered that "it’s called a fiber-optic cable".
CK
CK
yesterday
Related:

[#3821510] I took this picture. (CK) *audio*
[#2884781] Who took this picture? (CK) *audio*
[#4499827] I love taking pictures. (CK) *audio*
[#3123546] I like to take pictures. (chajadan) *audio*
[#2884783] Who took these pictures? (CK) *audio*
[#265308] I enjoy taking pictures. (CK) *audio*
[#2407163] I take a lot of pictures. (CK) *audio*
[#2210908] Why don't you take a picture? (CK) *audio*
[#1886607] Where was this picture taken? (CK) *audio*
[#2407195] I take pictures of a lot of things. (CK) *audio*
[#61886] Are we allowed to take pictures here? (CK) *audio*
[#1027266] This is the picture I took of Tom's house. (CK) *audio*
[#1026282] Tom didn't take many pictures on his trip. (CK) *audio*
[#3023335] Tom took a lot of pictures when he was in Boston. (CK) *audio*
maaster
yesterday
Objectivesea, thanks for the detailed response.
(I didn't care about whether your sentence was a translation.)
CK
CK
2 days ago
Related:

[#282835] You've got the wrong number. (CK) *audio*
[#64713] I'm afraid you have the wrong number. (CK) *audio*
[#282839] I am afraid you have the wrong number. (CK) *audio*
[#2642496] You've dialed the wrong number. (CK)
[#282837] I think you have the wrong number. (CK)
[#282834] You seem to have the wrong number. (Swift)
[#4496016] I believe you've dialed the wrong number. (CK)
[#282836] I'm afraid you have got the wrong number. (CM)
[#264991] Sorry, but I think you've got the wrong number. (Swift)
odexed
2 days ago
odexed
2 days ago
tommy_san
2 days ago - edited 2 days ago
日本語は過去形ですよ。
tommy_san
2 days ago
The Japanese translation doesn't match, does it?
CK
CK
2 days ago - edited 2 days ago
Out of context, my first thought wasn't gunpowder.

Note that since the German isn't directly linked, it doesn't matter what the meaning of the German is.
Objectivesea
2 days ago
To maaster's question, in English the definition of "black powder", according to my unilingual Thorndike-Barnhart dictionary, is "ordinary gunpowder, as distinguished from smokeless powder." So even if "gunpowder" was intended in German or Esperanto, I think "black powder" is a perfectly reasonable translation, since the meaning of that word pair includes both gunpowder and any other black powder that might be in that drawer.
maaster
2 days ago
al_ex_an_der
2 days ago - edited 2 days ago
>>>The solution lay before my eyes, but I hadn't seen it.
Maybe that's a possible translation too.

Mi fakte komprenas la esperanton frazon tiel:
La solvo estis antaŭ miaj okuloj, sed mi ĝin ne vidis.
The solution lay before my eyes, but I didn't see it.

kaj preferas aldoni adverbo(j)n por signi antaŭtempecon:
La solvo estis (nun) antaŭ miaj okuloj, sed pli frue mi ĝin ne vidis.
The solution lay before my eyes, but I hadn't seen it.
sacredceltic
2 days ago
I kind of chose a different wording in French for the two, though, to render the "slangish" effect of "shtuck", which I translated to its equivalent parisian slang « pépin ». it's really a translator's choice, I think...
Objectivesea
2 days ago
Maybe we should merge these French sentences and the portmanteau/pastiche English-Yiddish sentence with #2547455: "You'll be in trouble."
sacredceltic
2 days ago
say it's New-York English, which, however minor, is still significant...
CK
CK
2 days ago
Perhaps you should try to force a reload of the page.
Maybe the programmers have changed something and you are getting a cached version of an older external JavaScript file from your hard disk. (I'm not sure if any changes have been recently made, though.)
CK
CK
2 days ago
I assume all the edits were an attempt to change the flag.
I changed it for you.
Objectivesea
2 days ago
Please set the flag on this sentence to English; every time I try to reset it to English, the setting flips to Ilalian or Dutch or something else.
Objectivesea
2 days ago
The word is non-standard English cant, influenced by either Cockney or Yiddish. It will be encountered with infinitesimal frequency in actual spoken English.
sacredceltic
2 days ago
it means : you'll be in trouble.
Raizin
2 days ago
I fixed the sentence.

In English adjuncts of time usually follow adjuncts of place. It often sounds very unnatural the other way around. (As was the case here)

Or as my high school English teacher explained it, the usual sentence order in English is "who does what where when".
maaster
2 days ago
Could you please translate "shtuck" to French?
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