About unapproved sentences

You may see some sentences in red. These sentences are not approved by Tatoeba's community. They raise copyright issues or are otherwise problematic. If you are a contributor, please avoid translating them.

Logs

  • date unknown
He did a real snow job on my daughter.
  • date unknown
linked to #15317
  • date unknown
linked to #118221
linked to #787804
  • U2FS
  • Mar 10th 2011, 20:08
linked to #787882
linked to #812287
linked to #1405160
linked to #1405161
linked to #3191738

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Sentence #285443

eng
He did a real snow job on my daughter.

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Comments

PeterR
Jan 31st 2012, 08:04
I wonder how common the expression "to do a snow job on somebody" actually is. I know what it means, but only after looking it up here http://www.urbandictionary.com/...rm=snow%20job. Would a native speaker outside the US please comment ?
I'm asking because I feel very strongly about advanced learners of a foreign language embarrassing themselves by proudly bombarding natives speakers with phrases which only exist in dictionaries, not in natural conversation.
U2FS
Jan 31st 2012, 10:58
Well I only adopted it. Feel free to change it
sacredceltic
Jan 31st 2012, 11:17
@PeterR
actually, if you look at the tags, this has been "OK"'d by CK, who is a native US speaker.
Guybrush88
Jan 31st 2012, 11:37
here "to do a snow job" can be considered like "to deceive", right?
PeterR
Feb 4th 2012, 17:13
Sacredceltic, that "ok" by CK doesn't really answer my question, which was: Is this expression commonly used by native speakers outside the US. I have a sneaking feeling it isn't.

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