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He did a real snow job on my daughter.

added by , date unknown

#15317

linked by , date unknown

#118221

linked by , date unknown

#787804

linked by Hans_Adler, 2011-03-10 19:26

#787882

linked by U2FS, 2011-03-10 20:08

#812287

linked by McDutchie, 2011-03-26 14:01

#1405160

linked by Guybrush88, 2012-01-31 11:36

#1405161

linked by Guybrush88, 2012-01-31 11:36

#3191738

linked by carlosalberto, 2014-04-20 11:02

#3687080

linked by sharptoothed, 2014-12-11 15:37

Sentence #285443

eng
He did a real snow job on my daughter.

You cannot translate sentences because you did not add any language in your profile.

Add a language
deu
Er hat meine Tochter nach Strich und Faden eingewickelt.
fra
Il a réussi à faire croire à ma fille que son histoire était plausible.
fra
Il a vraiment fait gober son baratin à ma fille.
ina
Ille sapeva ben convincer mi filia de su historia deceptive.
ita
Ha davvero ingannato mia figlia.
ita
Lui ha davvero ingannato mia figlia.
jpn
彼のもっともらしい話に娘はまんまと乗せられてしまった。
por
Ele levou direitinho minha filha na conversa.
rus
Он изрядно навешал моей дочери лапши на уши.
epo
Li sukcese kredigis al mia filino, ke lia historio estas verŝajna.
epo
Li vere konvinkis mian filinon per sia ĉarlatanaĵo.

Comments

PeterR 2012-01-31 08:04 link permalink

I wonder how common the expression "to do a snow job on somebody" actually is. I know what it means, but only after looking it up here http://www.urbandictionary.com/...rm=snow%20job. Would a native speaker outside the US please comment ?
I'm asking because I feel very strongly about advanced learners of a foreign language embarrassing themselves by proudly bombarding natives speakers with phrases which only exist in dictionaries, not in natural conversation.

U2FS 2012-01-31 10:58 link permalink

Well I only adopted it. Feel free to change it

sacredceltic 2012-01-31 11:17 link permalink

@PeterR
actually, if you look at the tags, this has been "OK"'d by CK, who is a native US speaker.

Guybrush88 2012-01-31 11:37 link permalink

here "to do a snow job" can be considered like "to deceive", right?

PeterR 2012-02-04 17:13 link permalink

Sacredceltic, that "ok" by CK doesn't really answer my question, which was: Is this expression commonly used by native speakers outside the US. I have a sneaking feeling it isn't.