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His house is three times larger than mine.
- date unknown
linked to 117969
- date unknown
linked to 130209
darinmex - Oct 14th 2010, 19:25
linked to 566088
marcelostockle - Apr 29th 2012, 19:26
linked to 1100187
marcelostockle - Apr 29th 2012, 19:27
linked to 403857
marcelostockle - Apr 29th 2012, 19:27
linked to 615414
Amastan - May 27th 2012, 09:21
linked to 1594445
Shishir - Jun 18th 2012, 23:26
linked to 615474
freefighter - Aug 5th 2012, 18:47
linked to 1753770

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Sentence #285695

eng
His house is three times larger than mine.

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Comments

  1. Oct 9th 2010, 21:42
    > His house is three times larger than mine.

    Philosophical question:

    Say you have two objects, A and B.
    Say that A is 1 foot tall and B is 3 feet tall.

    Is it the same thing to say:
    1) B is three times the height of A
    and
    2) B is three times taller than A?

    To me, the first phrase implies that B is 3 feet tall, while the second phrase implies that B is 4 feet tall.

    Would the current sentence be considered an inaccurate translation of the Japanese "彼の家は私の家の3倍の大きさだ。" (literally, "his house is three times the size of my house")?

    Maybe I'm making a distinction that doesn't actually exist in practice.

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