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Can you recommend me a place to stay in London?

added by , date unknown

#192143

linked by , date unknown

#447829

linked by Hellerick, 2010-08-01 16:04

Can you recommend a place to stay in London?

added by LittleBoy, 2011-06-30 17:28

#967976

linked by LittleBoy, 2011-06-30 17:28

#1187195

linked by samueldora, 2011-10-20 23:22

#1235005

linked by marcelostockle, 2011-11-13 01:36

#1321250

linked by Scott, 2011-12-30 16:25

#1459487

linked by Eldad, 2012-02-27 18:25

#1459488

linked by Eldad, 2012-02-27 18:25

#1573241

linked by trieuho, 2012-05-14 17:13

#192143

linked by CK, 2013-01-21 02:09

Can you recommend a place to stay in London?

edited by al_ex_an_der, 2013-01-21 02:50

#29306

linked by shanghainese, 2013-02-02 16:49

#29306

linked by shanghainese, 2013-02-02 16:49

#447829

linked by shanghainese, 2013-02-02 16:51

#2555308

linked by Amastan, 2013-07-02 12:14

#2555309

linked by Amastan, 2013-07-02 12:14

#2555310

linked by Amastan, 2013-07-02 12:14

#2555312

linked by Amastan, 2013-07-02 12:14

#4789343

linked by deyta, 2015-12-24 22:15

Sentence #29306

eng
Can you recommend a place to stay in London?

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ber
Tzemred ad iyi-d-tneṣḥed s kra n wemkan aydeg zemreɣ ad qqimeɣ deg London?
ber
Tzemreḍ ad iyi-d-tneṣḥeḍ s kra n wemkan aydeg zemreɣ ad qqimeɣ deg London?
ber
Tzemrem ad iyi-d-tneṣḥem s kra n wemkan aydeg zemreɣ ad qqimeɣ deg London?
ber
Tzemremt ad iyi-d-tneṣḥemt s kra n wemkan aydeg zemreɣ ad qqimeɣ deg London?
deu
Können Sie mir eine Unterkunft in London empfehlen?
fra
Peux-tu me recommander un lieu de séjour à Londres?
fra
Pouvez-vous me recommander un endroit à Londres où je puisse séjourner ?
heb
תוכל להמליץ על מקום שאפשר להתאכסן בו בלונדון?
heb
תוכלי להמליץ על מקום להתאכסן בו בלונדון?
jpn
ロンドンで滞在する場所を推薦してもらえますか。
rus
Вы можете порекомендовать мне место в Лондоне, где я мог бы остановиться?
spa
¿Me puedes recomendar un lugar donde quedarme en Londres?
tur
Londra'da kalacak bir yer tavsiye edebilir misin?
vie
Bạn có thể giới thiệu tôi chỗ ở tại Luân đôn không?
eng
Can you recommend a place for me to stay in London?
eng
Can you recommend me a place to stay in London?
eng
Can you recommend to me a place to stay in London?
epo
Ĉu vi povas konsili al mi lokon en Londono, kie mi povas restadi?
epo
Ĉu vi povas rekomendi al mi restadejon en Londono?
pol
Poleci mi pan jakiś nocleg w Londynie?
rus
Можешь посоветовать место в Лондоне, куда можно было бы вписаться?
spa
¿Puedes recomendarme algún lugar donde estar en Londres?

Comments

orcrist 2013-01-21 00:56 link permalink

This sentence feels wrong. I have never heard "recommend" used in the dative. In my experience, nobody would say it that way ... we would use "recommend to me" or merely "recommend" instead. (However, the dative is tricky, and there are no firm rules dictating when one can use it.)

Dejo 2013-01-21 01:10 link permalink

Orcrist is right.
Either: Can you recommend a place to stay in London?
Or Can you recommend to me a place to stay in London?
I wouldn't use the second one although its correct.
The dictionary definition says."recommend someone or something to someone"

FeuDRenais 2013-01-21 01:32 link permalink

This sentence sounds fine to me. "recommend me" is just the shortened version of "recommend to me", most likely. I've definitely used this construction before and have heard other native speakers use it. Nothing wrong with it, IMO.

@orcrist: Regarding the grammar, wouldn't the dative be "recommend to someone"? Did you mean the accusative (e.g. "recommend someone")?

FeuDRenais 2013-01-21 01:36 link permalink

Other similar constructions would be:

Can you order me a sandwich?
Can you get me a drink?
Can you find me a hotel?

orcrist 2013-01-21 03:14 link permalink

I suppose that on occasion people use the "recommend me" pattern, but if I were writing or teaching, I would never write it or recommend it. That alone is worth noting here.

Some verbs (like "recommend", in my view) should not be used in the "verb + me" form because they have an unnatural feel ... textbooks that claim otherwise sound dubious. :-)

Dejo 2013-01-21 04:11 link permalink

"@FeudRenais. "recommend me" means "to give me a recommendation" Example: Can you recommend me to your boss, since I need a job.

FeuDRenais 2013-01-21 20:41 link permalink

@Dejo: Yes, I know. By the way, the sentence as you have it now has lost its original meaning. Now it's a recommendation without the receiving party ("me") specified.

Maybe it's an age difference, or a regional difference, but I don't see why the original was changed, as it was, IMO, perfectly fine and even better sounding than the alternatives proposed afterwards.

sharptoothed 2013-01-21 20:50 link permalink

> the sentence as you have it now has lost its original meaning

I have to agree. Japanese and Russian translation have "the receiving" party just like English original version had. So now we have mismatching translations.

Shishir 2013-01-21 20:59 link permalink

@sharptoothed: the same happens with the Spanish and the French sentences, they also specify the receiving party ("me").

Dejo 2013-01-21 21:46 link permalink

In English the receiving party is understood to be the questioner. Ergo there is no mismatch. In fact putting the "me" in, might be considered an overtranslation. Here is the reason why the English sentence sounds strange with "me". In English "me" can be either an object or an indirect object. A native speaker might first assume that it's an object, so when reading "Can you recommend me" will understand "can you put in a good word for me". Then when you continue reading the sentence, you realize that's an indirect object is meant here. The mental revision that becomes necessary in mid- sentence gives it an unnatural feel.

sharptoothed 2013-01-21 22:11 link permalink

2Dejo
I see your point. But, does the following situation possible? A journalist interviewing, say, a restaurant critic: "Personally, I don't like Italian cuisine, but I know Italian restaurants are your favourite subject. Can you recommend a good place to have an Italian style dinner in out city?"

Dejo 2013-01-21 22:23 link permalink

@sharptoothed
The structure of your sentence is exactly like the one above and the journalist is still the receiver of the information and whether or not he decides to pass it on to his readers is another question. However if you want to be specific about who the receiver is, then I suggest:
1.Can you recommend a good restaurant to our reader.
2.Can you recommend a restaurant to my liking.

As I'm writing this, I realize that in English we usually place the direct object before the indirect one: "Give it to me".

FeuDRenais 2013-01-22 00:39 link permalink

I think this is one of those sentences where native speakers disagree...

"Can you recommend me a place..." does not sound strange, IMO, as it is immediately evident, from the absence of the dative "to"/"for" after "me" that the meaning is "recommend TO me".

I also don't agree that putting "me" would be an over-translation. The sentence, as is, sounds more general - the speaker could be asking the person to recommend a place to someone else. I believe that sharptoothed's example illustrates this very well.