Etikedoj

Neniu etikedo pri tiu frazo.

Vidi ĉiujn etikedojn

Registroj

Sono un'insegnante giapponese.
ligita al #778135
ligita al #1549140
malligita disde #1549140
ligita al #1549155
ligita al #1549162
malligita disde #1549155
ligita al #1549173

Frazo n-ro 1549093

ita
Sono un'insegnante giapponese.
Vi ne povas traduki frazojn, ĉar vi ne aldonis iun lingvon al via parofilpaĝo.
Aldoni lingvon
deu
Ich bin eine japanische Lehrerin.
eng
I'm a Japanese teacher.
nld
Ik ben een Japanse lerares.
deu
Ich bin Japanischlehrer.
deu
Ich bin ein japanischer Lehrer.
deu
Ich bin Japanischlehrerin.
epo
Mi estas japana instruistino.
epo
Mi estas instruistino pri la japana.
fra
Je suis un professeur de japonais.
fra
Je suis enseignant en japonais.
ind
Saya guru bahasa Jepang.
ita
Sono un insegnante giapponese.
ita
Sono un insegnante di giapponese.
ita
Sono un'insegnante di giapponese.
ita
Io sono un insegnante di giapponese.
ita
Io sono un'insegnante di giapponese.
ita
Io sono un insegnante giapponese.
ita
Io sono un'insegnante giapponese.
jbo
mi ctuca fo lo ponbau
jpn
私は日本語の教師です。
(わたし)日本語(にほんご)教師(きょうし) です 。
jpn
私は国語の教師です。
(わたし)国語(こくご)教師(きょうし) です 。
nld
Ik ben leraar Japans.
nld
Ik ben een Japanse leraar.
rus
Я преподаватель японского.
spa
Soy profesor de japonés.

Komentoj

Guybrush88
Apr 25th 2012, 15:34
in questo caso un'insegnante di nazionalità giapponese
ninuzzo
May 4th 2012, 12:46
The English sentence is ambiguous. In English this ambiguity is due to the fact the adjective (Japanese) is put before the noun (teacher) with no indication of case (either by word ending or preposition). In Italian there is no such ambiguity:
Sono un'insegnante di Giapponese = I'm a Japanese language teacher = I'm a teacher of Japanese
because we use "di", meaning "of" here it means that you teach Japanese

Sono un'insegnante Giapponese = Sono un'insegnante del Giappone = I'm a teacher from Japan
here "Giapponese" is clearly an adjective denoting nationality and referred to "insegnante"

As a side note, insegnante is invariable:

a male teacher = un insegnante
a female teacher = una insegnante or un'insegnante

The apostrophe signals the gender in writing. In speaking if you elide the article, the gender remains ambiguous, if there is no context to tell you.

I think it would be better to split this sentence in two, one for each meaning.
ninuzzo
May 4th 2012, 14:48
I mean that the English sentence "I'm a Japanese teacher" is a bit ambiguous, does "Japanese" refer to the language taught or the teacher's nationality? It indeed translates into two different sentences in Italian. Here are all their variations:

(1) Japanese means nationality
"Sono un'insegnante Giapponese" (feminine)
"Sono una insegnante Giapponese" (feminine)
"Sono un insegnante Giapponese" (masculine)
"Sono un'insegnante del Giappone" (feminine)
"Sono una insegnante del Giappone" (feminine)
"Sono un insegnante del Giappone" (masculine)
"Ich bin Japanischlehrer"

(2) Japanese is the language taught
"Sono un'insegnante di Giapponese" (feminine)
"Sono una insegnante di Giapponese" (feminine)
"Sono un insegnante di Giapponese" (masculine)
"Ich bin ein japanischer Lehrer"

I suggest that meanings (1) and (2) should be kept distinct. I would group sentences meaning (1) in all languages in one page and those meaning (2) in another page. The English ambiguous sentence can be included as a translation for both (1) and (2).

This is an English problem, and maybe a problem of other (almost) case-less languages, not a German or Italian problem.
Hans07
May 4th 2012, 15:25
The japanese sentence says teacher of japanese language
ninuzzo
May 4th 2012, 16:02
Grazie mille! I understand. But 'Ich bin ein japanischer Lehrer' still has some direct (green-arrow) Italian translations which are wrong like "Sono un insegnante giapponese". It should be "Sono un insegnante di giapponese". That 'di' is needed because "Sono un insegnante giapponese" means "Ich bin Japanischlehrer". I guess I have to post this remark to the owner of the wrong Italian translation for a correction, not you. Is that correct?