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Sentence text

License: CC BY 2.0 FR

Logs

This sentence was initially added as a translation of sentence #1745124He dedicated his life to medicine..

Hayatını tıpa adadı.

added by an unknown member, August 12, 2012

linked by an unknown member, August 12, 2012

linked by emigonza, February 28, 2019

Sentence #1770066

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Comments

Lenin_1917 Lenin_1917 April 28, 2015 April 28, 2015 at 4:33:41 PM UTC link Permalink

tıpa = medicine?

brauchinet brauchinet April 28, 2015 April 28, 2015 at 4:36:05 PM UTC link Permalink

evet, tıp = medicine

Lenin_1917 Lenin_1917 April 28, 2015 April 28, 2015 at 4:43:13 PM UTC link Permalink

teşekkürler))

Eldad Eldad April 28, 2015, edited April 28, 2015 April 28, 2015 at 8:39:03 PM UTC, edited April 28, 2015 at 8:47:36 PM UTC link Permalink

Interesting. Isn't "tıp" changed to "tıb" when the p is not the last letter in the word?
Namely, same as "kitap", which changes into "kitabim" ktp.
Both words originate from Arabic, so I would expect both of them to behave similarly.

tornado tornado April 29, 2015, edited April 29, 2015 April 29, 2015 at 9:04:24 PM UTC, edited April 29, 2015 at 9:06:26 PM UTC link Permalink

@Eldad

Yet another exception in Turkish.

http://i.hizliresim.com/YBB8bj.jpg

TDK says the nominative form is "tıp", but if it has a suffix that begins with a vowel, then the last letter "p" turns into "b" and gets doubled.

So in this sentence the correct spelling is "tıbba" according to TDK. However, you may also see the other spelling(tıpa) often.

Examples of both usages:

http://www.radikal.com.tr/sagli..._isyan-1046906

http://www.milliyet.com.tr/cena...lhaber-704012/


I called it an exception, because very similar words like "tip"(type), "top"(ball) and "tüp"(tube) don't behave that way.

Normally, when a word consists of only one syllable, lenition is not applied. Hence,
"kitap + ım → kitabım(my book)", but "top + um → topum(my ball)".

Eldad Eldad April 29, 2015 April 29, 2015 at 9:11:01 PM UTC link Permalink

Thank you very much, tornado.
So, regarding "tıp", both forms are possible and are considered standard, if I got you correctly. One more thing that I learned this time is that in this case, it's not only one b, but double b - but, to be honest, I expected it to be like that, as "tibb" in Arabic has shadda on it (on the b).

I haven't thought about tip, top and tüp; so I guess I imagined that this phenomenon only applies to words from Arabic origin.

Thanks a lot for your most illuminating comments, as always.

tornado tornado April 29, 2015 April 29, 2015 at 10:24:45 PM UTC link Permalink

You're welcome.

As you mentioned, shadda is probably responsible for that consonant doubling. Some monosyllabic words with Arabic origin like "Rab" and "had" also behave that way.