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We cannot determine yet whether this sentence was initially derived from translation or not.

The English have adopted many words from French.

added by an unknown member, date unknown

Sentence #26137

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Unlink this translation link Make into direct translation chevron_right
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Unlink this translation link Make into direct translation chevron_right
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Comments

odexed odexed April 13, 2015 April 13, 2015 at 5:31:49 PM UTC link Permalink

has?

Impersonator Impersonator April 13, 2015 April 13, 2015 at 5:34:46 PM UTC link Permalink

Actually, it looks like this sentence speaks about the English people (cf. 英国人 in Japanese) and most translations don't match.

patgfisher patgfisher April 13, 2015 April 13, 2015 at 11:11:24 PM UTC link Permalink

>has?

"have" is correct.

As Impersonator says, it refers to the English people (plural). If it referred to the English language it would be "English has adopted" (no article).

Ooneykcall Ooneykcall April 14, 2015 April 14, 2015 at 3:13:38 AM UTC link Permalink

If most translations don't match, it may be best to change this sentence and then resumbit the current form as a new sentence?

Impersonator Impersonator April 14, 2015, edited April 14, 2015 April 14, 2015 at 7:57:40 AM UTC, edited April 14, 2015 at 7:58:03 AM UTC link Permalink

No, it's better to unlink them. Otherwise we'll be changing the sentences which are by themselves correct.

Ooneykcall Ooneykcall April 14, 2015 April 14, 2015 at 12:14:12 PM UTC link Permalink

Don't stick to the letter while missing the spirit. The point is that correct sentences should stay in the corpus. If this sentence is changed but a new sentence is added copying the present one, that purpose is served.

Impersonator Impersonator April 14, 2015, edited April 14, 2015 April 14, 2015 at 12:22:25 PM UTC, edited April 14, 2015 at 12:26:43 PM UTC link Permalink

> Don't stick to the letter while missing the spirit.

I believe you don’t understand the implications of changing the correct senteces, especially the Japanese sentences from Tanaka corpus (and the English one corresponds to Japanese, so if you change the English you’ll have to change the Japanese too). Japanese sentences may have invisible metadata associated with them (you can download it as 'Japanese indices' in http://tatoeba.org/eng/downloads ), and changing this sentence will make the metadata out-of-sync.

Actually, it *will* cause troubles — this sentence has this metadata, in the following form:
188990 26137 英国人 は|1 沢山{たくさん} の 語(ご)[02] を フランス語 から 借入~ 為る(する){した}

I don’t know if anyone uses this metadata right now (I believe WWWJDIC no longer does — if I'm not mistaken?), but the point is: there’s more to sentences than you can immediately see.

Another use case: someone has a list of sentences about different peoples, and suddenly it has a sentence about the language instead of the sentence of peoples.

You don’t know where sentences are used now, and you don’t know how your changes will break these use cases.

So it’s always important not to change the correct sentences. It may be OK if sentence was recently added, but you should be extra-careful with sentences that have been around for a long time.