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This sentence was initially added as a translation of sentence #35813Clerks with sticky fingers won't keep their jobs for long..

Les employés aux doigts collants ne vont pas garder leurs emplois très longtemps.

added by sacredceltic, August 25, 2010

Sentence #479203

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Comments

fekundulo fekundulo April 16, 2013 April 16, 2013 at 10:37:19 PM UTC link Permalink

I think the meaning 'clerk' is someone who shoves paper, not just any employee.

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 16, 2013 April 16, 2013 at 11:12:12 PM UTC link Permalink

According to my knowledge and my dictionary, a "clerk" can be any type of employee in an office or a shop.
It seems that there is a difference between British English, where it is more "office"-type and US where it is more "shop/salesman"-type...http://www.thefreedictionary.com/clerk

fekundulo fekundulo April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 8:58:14 AM UTC link Permalink

If you read the English pun again, it makes sense only as applied to a person who keeps the records. If such a person suffers from sticky fingers, flipping through papers is awkward. This is a wink at the profession, who like to drag affairs to nausea.
I am telling you this because I think the EO translation diverges too much.

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 9:04:18 AM UTC link Permalink

It may also refer to US clerks, ie shop assistants, who would steal banknotes from the cashier...

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 9:04:55 AM UTC link Permalink

To have sticky fingers means to steal.

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 9:06:58 AM UTC link Permalink

Also, the bureaucratic pun doesn't work, because slow bureaucrats actually keep their jobs...

fekundulo fekundulo April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 10:03:19 AM UTC link Permalink

I actually lived in the US quite a while, went to school there, and never encountered the the noun 'clerk' in relation with salesmanship. The word 'clerk' is rarely used in the US at all. I don't believe employee is a precise enough translation of 'clerk'. Isn't there a better French word for it?

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 10:35:52 AM UTC link Permalink

Then you missed something back there. It's a big country...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clerks

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/clerks/

fekundulo fekundulo April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 10:43:41 AM UTC link Permalink

I had missed a lot, although I don't miss it at all.
The question is, are 'employees' not too general for this context.

sacredceltic sacredceltic April 17, 2013 April 17, 2013 at 11:02:59 AM UTC link Permalink

I already replied :

Out of context, these "clerks" can be either standard office employees (British English) or shop assistants (US English, as I just demonstrated in my reference above).

For both cases, we use « employé » in France.

We might specify « employés de bureau » if we know for sure they're office ones or « employé de/du magasin » if they are shop assistants, but we wouldn't bother to specify in such a general consideration where the context is implicit.
Here, I think it applies to shop assistants who steal from the cashier, but you're free to imagine other contexts...

You must not be annoyed because translations diverge from the context you have in mind, if it applies. it is normal. The [epo] sentence translates this French sentence and it is normal that it diverges from English as languages don't match one to one and different contexts can be extrapolated. You are free to coin yet other esperanto translations from the English sentence, with no effect on this French sentence...