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CK CK May 19, 2010, edited October 25, 2019 May 19, 2010 at 1:25:38 AM UTC, edited October 25, 2019 at 8:03:38 AM UTC link Permalink

[not needed anymore- removed by CK]

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Scott Scott May 19, 2010 May 19, 2010 at 2:51:01 PM UTC link Permalink

It's not technically wrong not to translate the younger/elder brother part. Not specifying it is probably more natural in English. So, I don't see a special need to do this. Keep in mind that Japanese sentences could also be translation of the original English (I also tend to forget this), in which case the older/younger part would have to be invented by the translator.

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sysko sysko May 19, 2010 May 19, 2010 at 4:30:28 PM UTC link Permalink

I don't know Japanese, but in Chinese the same things happens as one can't say "this is my brother" without precising if he's older or younger.
So I agree with Scott, at least one can two translations, and in commets precise "this one is translated to stay closer to the original meaning" and "this one is a more natural way to say though some things are added/removed"

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CK CK May 19, 2010, edited October 25, 2019 May 19, 2010 at 5:27:59 PM UTC, edited October 25, 2019 at 8:03:46 AM UTC link Permalink

[not needed anymore- removed by CK]

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sysko sysko May 19, 2010 May 19, 2010 at 5:33:54 PM UTC link Permalink

anyway the problem occurs simply with "you" which can both translated by "tu" (one guy, not formal) "vous" (2nd plural person) and "vous" (2nd singular person but formal way) in French, and when I translate English sentences.

and anyway the chinese will appears as an indirect translations of the japanese sentences, so one should know that indirect translations are not to be trusted, they're just here to give you the "raw" meaning, in case and also to permit people to link them if they can be considered as "direct translations" rather than add a second time this translation