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This sentence was initially added as a translation of sentence #788187.

Fue brillero y las tovas silatas gieron y llueron en la valba; todo miamsa fueron las borgas y la muma ruó de grám.

added by BraveSentry, March 22, 2011 at 12:41 PM

#788187

linked by BraveSentry, March 22, 2011 at 12:41 PM

Fue brillero y las tovas sílatas gieron y llueron en la valba; todo miamsa eran las borgas y la muma ruo de gram.

edited by BraveSentry, March 23, 2011 at 8:30 AM

Estabe brillantoso y las tovas sílatas gieron y llueron en la valba; todo miamsa eran las borgas y la muma ruo de gram.

edited by BraveSentry, March 23, 2011 at 8:30 AM

Estaba brillantoso y las tovas sílatas gieron y llueron en la valba; todo miamsa eran las borgas y la muma ruo de gram.

edited by BraveSentry, March 24, 2011 at 5:47 PM

#575163

linked by BraveSentry, October 10, 2011 at 4:09 PM

Sentence #804829

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Comments

Shishir Shishir March 22, 2011 at 3:59 PM March 22, 2011 at 3:59 PM link Permalink

huh?? can you tell me what is THIS? :P

BraveSentry BraveSentry March 22, 2011 at 7:00 PM March 22, 2011 at 7:00 PM link Permalink

´tis my translation of the first verse of "The Jabberwocky" by lewis carol. i hope it sounds spanish enough. if you have suggestions regarding the not-really-spanish words, go ahead. :)

Shishir Shishir March 22, 2011 at 7:37 PM March 22, 2011 at 7:37 PM link Permalink

I really wonder what's the use of a sentence like this one, that not only does not teach you anything, but also may mislead you...
But anyway, it would be better to start with "Estaba brillantoso," it sounds more Spanish :P
And also, if you want it to look Spanish, remove the accents of the words ruó and grám, remember that in Spanish monosyllables do not usually carry accent. If you want, you can add an accent to silatas (on the first i)and I'd better say "eran las borgas y la muma ruo..."
By the way, does any of the words that appear in the sentence have a meaning?

Manfredo Manfredo January 24, 2012 at 4:51 PM January 24, 2012 at 4:51 PM link Permalink

Shishir, if you knew only a little bit of world-literature, you should know that this is the most famous nonsense-poem of the English language. You can find it in the book "Through the Looking-glas and what Alice found there" by Lewis Carroll. Just do google!

Shishir Shishir January 24, 2012 at 4:55 PM January 24, 2012 at 4:55 PM link Permalink

Manfredo, you'd better be more respectful, I've studied English literature and I perfectly know what this is, but I don't think tatoeba, a place where sentences should be correct and natural, is a good place to write sentences that actually don't serve for anything but to confuse a learner who probably wonders if these words exist, or simply what this is.