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sharptoothed
2018-02-02 11:14
** New chart **

Tatoeba 250 Most Translated Sentences Chart is available:
http://tatoeba.j-langtools.com/mosttranslated/
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deniko
2018-02-02 12:02
That's curious, thanks for that.

I don't know why, but I was mildly surprised to find 3 Finnish sentences in the chart.

If you ever have time and inspiration, a few more ideas for your charts:

1. Most translated sentences for each language (so that would be "How are you?" for English, "Pardonu min pro mia malfruo." for Esperanto, "Was ist das?" for German, etc.

2. Sentences translated into most languages.
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sharptoothed
2018-02-02 12:52
Thanks for your suggestions. Maybe I implement them some day. :-)
deniko
2018-02-02 12:20 - 2018-02-02 12:21
Also, there's one interesting thing in sentences with so many direct translation - and those are indirect translations into the same language. It's like the game of Chinese Whispers.

For example, indirect translations of "Go away":

https://i.imgur.com/pGjX4yv.png

Some of them are obviously related and close in meaning.

But there are also phrases like

Wow.
Terrific.
Brilliant.
Understood.

It's a funny thought, that somewhere out there there's a sentence in some language that can be translated both as "Go away!" and "Brilliant".
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Selena777
2018-02-02 16:55
Perhaps, they're just mistranslated.
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sabretou
2018-02-03 00:10
Homographs can often cause such interesting shifts in meaning. In Marathi, for instance, the words that mean 'to read' and 'to survive' are homographs, i.e. different words written in the same way. So a sentence that says "he will read" (तो वाचेल) can also be translated as "he will survive".
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Selena777
2018-02-03 11:08
Well, it's true.

Btw, it will be good to have a feature which let hide obviously wrong indirect translations.